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Astronomy Events For 2022 last edit January 3, 2022. If you want a Word document for the list of events: Download a Word Document of Astronomy Events for 2022 (3rd draft). This document was created January 3rd, 2022

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Astronomical Events 2022 Times are Central Time Zone ...OK To Copy 3rd Draft see the website on the back side for updates after Jan 9th, 2022 January 2 New Moon ... Venus is visible in the evening sky January 4 Today, the Earth is closest to the Sun for 2022. (Cold temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere are due to the tilt of Earth's axis. The Sun is lower in the sky today than in July.) January 3,4 Quadrantids Meteor Shower Meteors appear to come from Constellation Bootes. View after midnight. January 5 Crescent Moon and Jupiter will be 4.5 degrees apart. View soon after sunset. January 7 Mercury is at a large angle east (left) of Sun in the sky. View it low in the western sky shortly after sunset. January 17 Full Moon February 1 New Moon February 16 Full Moon March 2 New Moon March 13 Beginning of Daylight Savings Time. Move clocks ahead one hour Saturday night. March 18 Full Moon March 20 March Equinox ... 12 hours of night, 12 hours of daylight for all points on Earth. This is the start of Spring for the Northern Hemisphere. March 28 Mars, Venus, Saturn, Waning Crescent Moon close to each other in predawn sky April 1 New Moon April 4 Crescent Moon about 5 degrees from the Pleiades star cluster after sunset April 16 Full Moon April 17 Easter Easter is celebrated on the first Sunday after the first Full Moon after March 21st. The latest date for Easter is April 25th (1943, 2038). April 22,23 Lyrids Meteor Shower- about 20 meteors/hour if you view from a dark location. Meteors appear to come from the Lyra constellation. Observe after midnight but waning gibbous moon will limit the number of meteors than can be seen in 2022. April 29 Mercury is at a large angle east (left) of Sun in the sky. View it low in the western sky shortly after sunset. April 30 New Moon May 1 Venus and Jupiter 0.2 degrees apart on the sky, view one hour before sunrise May 6,7 Eta Aquarids Meteor Shower - about 20 meteors/hour if you have a dark sky. Meteors appear to come from Aquarius. Observe after midnight. May 15 Full Moon May 15 Total Lunar Eclipse -Partial eclipse starts at 9:28 p.m. CDT-Total eclipse begins at 10:29 p.m. CDT-Total Eclipse ends 11:54 p.m. CDT-For viewers in Oregon, the moon will rise about the same time as the total eclipse phase begins. This may present a nice red disk near the horizon for your viewing. May 29 Mars and Jupiter close (0.6 degrees)in the low eastern sky. View around 4 a.m. May 30 New Moon June 14 Full Moon - "Supermoon." The Moon will appear slightly larger and brighter in the sky as it will be at a point in its orbit slightly closer to the Earth than its average distance. June 21 June Solstice, Start of Summer for Northern Hemisphere. Start of Winter for S. Hemisphere. Greatest length of daylight hours for N. Hemisphere. June 29 New Moon July 4 The Earth is at its farthest point from the Sun today. (Warm temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere are due to the tilt of Earth's axis. The Sun is higher in the sky in July than in January.) July 10 Antares 3 degrees south of the Moon, view soon after sunset July 13 Full Moon "Supermoon" The Moon will appear slightly larger and brighter in the sky as it will be at a point in its orbit slightly closer to the Earth than its average distance. July 28 New Moon July 28 Jupiter begins retrograde (westward) motion on the sky, as viewed from Earth August 12 Full Moon-"Supermoon." The Moon will appear slightly larger and brighter in the sky as it will be at a point in its orbit slightly closer to the Earth than its average distance. August 12,13 Perseid Meteor Shower - Up to 50 meteors per hour if you have a dark sky. Meteors appear to come from Perseus constellation. Observe after midnight. The Moon will interfere with viewing these meteors in 2022. August 14 Saturn Opposition Saturn is closest to Earth, and brightest, for 2022. It is visible all night long. View it in the eastern sky at sunset and in the southern sky at midnight. August 27 New Moon August 27 Mercury is at a large angle east (left) of Sun in the sky. View it low in the western sky shortly after sunset. September 10 Full Moon September 23 September Equinox, 12 hours of night, 12 hours of daylight, Start of Fall for Northern Hemisphere September 25 New Moon September 26 Jupiter at Opposition (opposite side of Earth compared to Sun) Jupiter is closest to Earth, and brightest, for 2022. It is visible all night long. View it in the eastern sky at sunset and in the southern sky at midnight. October 9 Full Moon October 21,22 Orionid Meteor Shower - perhaps 20 meteors per hour if you have a dark sky. View after midnight. Meteors will appear to come from the Orion constellation. Light from the waning Crescent Moon will not interfere with viewing these meteors in 2022. October 25 New Moon October 28 Crescent Moon is near Antares, view after sunset October 30 Mars begins its retrograde (westward) motion on the sky, as viewed from Earth November 6 End of Daylight Savings Time, Set clocks back one hour Saturday night. November 8 Full Moon November 8 Early morning-Total Lunar Eclipse start of total eclipse phase 4:16 a.m. CST-end of total eclipse phase 5:41 a.m., as the moon sets in Nebraska. This is the last total lunar eclipse until 2025. November 17,18 Leonid Meteor Shower - Up to 15 meteors per hour if your sky is dark. Meteors appear to come from Leo. View after midnight. Light from the nearly third Quarter Moon will limit the number of meteors that can be seen in 2022. November 23 New Moon November 23 Jupiter ends retrograde motion and resumes eastward motion on the sky December 2 Jupiter is 2.5 degrees north of Moon on the sky, around 7 p.m. December 8 Full Moon December 8 Mars at Opposition. Mars is closest to Earth, and brightest, for 2022. It is visible all night long. View it in the eastern sky at sunset and in the southern sky at midnight. AND Mars is near the Moon on the sky around 10 p.m. December 13,14 Geminids Meteor Shower - up to 50 meteors/hour if you have a dark sky. Meteors seem to come from the Gemini constellation. View after midnight. Light from the waning gibbous Moon will interfere with observing the meteors in 2022. December 21 December Solstice This date has the shortest amount of daylight for observers in the Northern Hemisphere. Start of Winter for Northern Hemisphere December 21 Mercury is at a large angle east (left) of Sun in the sky. View it low in the western sky shortly after sunset. December 23 New Moon !!!Note---Start making plans for the April 8, 2024 Total Solar Eclipse that will be visible from Texas through Maine. Totality (sun blocked by Moon) lasts around 4.5 min. This list was assembled by Greg Clements. Sources:eclipse.gsfc.nasa.gov/lunar.html, seasky.org, universetoday.com, timeanddate.com, nakedeyeplanets.com, www.astropixels.com/almanac/almanac21/almanac2022gmt.html www.telescopeguide.org/astronomy-guide-2021-2022/, in-the-sky.org Astronomy videos on YouTube, indexed at astronomy.gpclements.com Free, no registration Physics videos on YouTube, indexed at physics.gpclements.com Free, no registration The physics videos (about 340) are for an introductory physics class. The astronomy videos (about 200) include videos for the general public and educational videos. This sky calendar can be freely accessed and printed at astronomy.gpclements.com .


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